Install this theme
Project 4 Statement (revised)

These drawings investigate the practice of forcing the viewer to physically change position in order to gain knowledge about the piece. A new image and composition can be gathered by the viewer when changing the perspective that they view the images from. In short, this piece is intentionally altering the viewers place in relation to the images.

Stock photograph portraits reside as the subject due to the static nature of these images. There is very minimal interaction with the viewer in stock portraits and this idea has been utilized as a contrasting point when coupling it with the fact that in the created images you are forced to physically interact in order to truly see the stock image. When the viewer looks straight forward from in front of the picture planes they see a smudged, smeared, or stretched image that is not entirely recognizable. However, when the viewer steps to the side to look, views from an angle, or looks up at the plane while laying directly on the floor below one of the paintings they will gain a new view and unlock the actual image being presented.

The three images are created digitally entirely in Photoshop. There, they are composed similarly to an oil painting: using a series of marks done on one digital “layer” while building up traditional layers of color, line, and value.  There is an attempt at replicating the physical nature of a traditional painting by mounting the printed digital painting on a wood board and cradling it to appear to have depth similar to a stretched canvas. The glossed and textured finish is done by hand, and adds to the illusion of this being a real painting. While it can create a visually similar product, a digital painting remains merely a simulation of traditional painting. It lacks the tradition, the depth, and the naturals aspects involved in the process of creating an oil painting.

Parallels can be drawn between this digital painting process that is featured in this piece and the ideas that have been presented in regards to the stock image portraits. Both are attempting to be something they are not. This piece highlights that interaction, or lack thereof, between the simulated image and the authentic viewer.

Project 4 Statement

These drawings investigate the practice of forcing the viewer to physically change position in order to gain knowledge about the piece. A new image and composition can be gathered by the viewer when changing the perspective that they view the images from. In short, this piece is intentionally altering the viewers place in relation to the images.

Stock photograph portraits reside as the subject because of the static nature of these images. There is very minimal interaction with the viewer in stock portraits and this idea has been utilized as a contrasting point when coupling it with the fact that in the created images you are forced to interact in order to truly see the stock image. When the viewer looks straight forward from in front of the picture planes they see a smudged, smeared, and stretched image that is not entirely recognizable. However, when the viewer steps to the side to look, views from an angle, or looks up at the plane while laying directly on the floor below one of the paintings they will gain a new view and unlock the actual image being presented.

The three images are created digitally entirely in Photoshop. There, they are composed similarly to an oil painting: using a series of marks done on one digital “layer” while building up traditional layers of color, line, and value.  There is an attempt at replicating the physical nature of a traditional painting by mounting the printed digital painting on a wood board and cradling it to appear to have depth similar to a stretched canvas. While it can create a visually similar product, a digital painting remains merely a simulation of traditional painting. It lacks the texture, depth, and weight of a painting on stretched canvas and also loses the natural aspect involved in the process of creating an oil painting.

Parallels can be drawn between this digital painting process that is featured in this piece and the ideas that have been presented in regards to the stock image portraits. Both are attempting to be something they are not. This piece highlights that interaction, or lack thereof, between the simulated image and the authentic viewer.